Yarrow

Etymology

The Latin name achillea millefolium is derived from the Greek achilleios, which can be translated as “herb of Achilles”. The hero of the Trojan War, Achilles was trained in the art of healing wounds by the centaur Chiron. Millefolium comes from the Greek myriophyllon, which means “countless leaves”.

Achillea millefolium

Characteristics

Plant family Asteraceae
Flowering season May to October
Harvest Flowering herb: May to October
Signature properties The white flowers are reminiscent of a sheep’s fleece; the stems and compound leaves are densely interlinked; the network of roots loosens the soil
Vegetation Grassland, edges of paths and fields, sparse forest floor, landfill sites

 

Recipe

Yarrow soup (for two)

Wash the yarrow flowers and leaves and pat dry. Finely chop 2 tablespoons of leaves. Pluck the flower head from a yarrow plant and put to one side. Chop and dice an onion and sauté in butter until soft and opaque. Add the yarrow leaves along with 100 g of peas and sauté for 5 minutes. Deglaze with 20 ml of vegetable stock, bring to the boil and then puree the mixture. Stir the remaining stock into the puree together with the petals from the flower head and add salt and pepper. Whisk 15 ml of cream with an egg and an egg yolk and add to the soup. Reheat (but don’t boil) and serve immediately.